Welcome to the Lost Treasure Archives

Here you can browse articles from current and previous Lost Treasure publications spanning several decades.

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Brief History:

In 1966 True Treasure magazine started publication as a bi-monthly and was soon joined by Treasure World magazine, also a bi-monthly published on alternate months. In December 1975 these two magazines were joined and re-named Lost Treasure magazine.

Over the years three other magazines, Rockhound, Treasure Facts and Treasure Cache were added to the publishing family. Of these six magazines only Treasure Cache/Treasure Facts and Lost Treasure are currently being published.

Disclaimer Notice:

The articles and stories in these archives are made available for your enjoyment and entertainment only and should not be used as your only source of fact. They cover material from our six publications going back to 1966. Many of the laws, facts and situations that were in effect at the time of the articles publication may have changed now. Always check with Local, State or Federal officials before acting on any information contained in these archives. And always get permission to hunt before you start your search. These articles may not be reproduced without the express written permission of Lost Treasure, Inc. Although our scanners made every effort to correct typos or incorrect characters some have slipped through. Thank you for your understanding.



Never Give Up

By Bill Gallagher
From page 36 of the January, 2014 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2014 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As far as Sundays go, it was not turning out to be a very good one. Sundays are downtown Tampa days, and they are usually pretty productive, but this one, not so much. In fact, everywhere I hunted I hit the wall, zilch, trash, and it seemed as if I was going to be skunked.
What had I done to deserve this? Nothing, that’s what; I did nothing deserving a skunking, but it’s what I was getting for rising early and working strenuously for 5 or 6 hours. It was not fair, and all that.
I persevered though, and so did #2, who was not exactly getting skunked, but was not having a good day of it either. Perseverance is all that works anywhere, at any time, in anything, I can attest. Thank goodness something works, is all I can say.



Tools of the Trade - Prospecting the Pilbara Goldfield

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the January, 2014 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2014 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I can’t count how many times over the years I have been asked, “Where is your favorite place to prospect in Australia?” I will be the first to admit that this is a tough question. I have traveled all across the country and have experienced nearly every climate and terrain Australia has to offer. The look and feel of each region varies greatly, and each is captivating in its own way.



Never Give Up

By Bill Gallagher
From page 36 of the January, 2014 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2014 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As far as Sundays go, it was not turning out to be a very good one. Sundays are downtown Tampa days, and they are usually pretty productive, but this one, not so much. In fact, everywhere I hunted I hit the wall, zilch, trash, and it seemed as if I was going to be skunked.
What had I done to deserve this? Nothing, that’s what; I did nothing deserving a skunking, but it’s what I was getting for rising early and working strenuously for 5 or 6 hours. It was not fair, and all that.
I persevered though, and so did #2, who was not exactly getting skunked, but was not having a good day of it either. Perseverance is all that works anywhere, at any time, in anything, I can attest. Thank goodness something works, is all I can say.



Cache Tips and Tricks

By John Minges
From page 10 of the January, 2014 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2014 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Back when I was a boy it was always exciting to watch a movie or TV show where one of the main characters would press a button and open a secret door that led to a hidden room or basement. 



Treasure Hunting Cranberry Farms

By Andrew Hind
From page 32 of the January, 2014 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2014 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The changing foliage, from vibrant green to a painter’s palette of brilliant red, orange and yellow, and the cold snap that has you reaching for sweaters aren’t the only things that let you know that autumn has arrived.



Mendicant Michelangelos

By Jay Pastor
From page 23 of the January, 2014 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2014 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Sometimes coins modified by tramps are more attractive or fitting than the original designs.



Tools of the Trade - Hunting Sidewalks

By By Andy Sabisch
From page 47 of the December, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over the past few months we've covered the subjects of identifying, sorting, cleaning, appraising and, if desired, selling your finds. Based on the positive feedback I've received, it looks like that information was useful to a great many of you and I appreciate your feedback attesting to that.



How to Hunt Drive-In Movie Theaters

By By Jerry Eckhart
From page 24 of the December, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


You don’t see them a lot anymore, but in parts of the nation they are making a comeback. I am talking about those large skeletons of what were once popular hangouts for adults and teens alike. 

From their early inception until the 1980’s, when they began to close, drive-in movie theaters were popular entertainment centers for all ages. They provided a casual setting for families and dating teenagers alike. 

Families would spread blankets in front of their cars and relax while watching the movie. Some would back their pickups with the bed facing the screen and stretch out in the back. On weekends every space was filled with cars, and each space was a place for coins to be lost. 



Missing and Abandoned Island Treasure

By Pat Hughes
From page 44 of the December, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Missing and Abandoned Island Treasure

By Pat Hughes



American Silver Eagles

By Frank Colletti
From page 53 of the December, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


American Silver Eagles

By Frank Colletti



Missing and Abandoned Island Treasure

By Pat Hughes
From page 44 of the December, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Missing and Abandoned Island Treasure

By Pat Hughes



Get To The Point

By Joe Patrick
From page 6 of the November, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


“Hey Scott...whatcha got?”
“Another Indian Head,” he replies. “Well, that must make about 30 between us so far today.”
“Awesome site, eh?”
A few minutes pass and now it’s my turn, as my headphones signal a distinct, round coin-sound at the base of a huge Oak tree. Upon careful excavation, I see and retrieve a 1906 Barber dime. A few feet away, I hear another ‘solid’ signal and this time, I retrieve a 1906 Barber quarter!



Tools of the Trade - Maddie’s Unexpected Find

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the November, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I had to stop digging for a moment to wipe the sweat from my eyes. The salt burned as I quickly tried to rub it away with my shirt sleeve. Although the pine needles and loamy soil beneath my feet were easy enough to dig, the humidity felt as if it had doubled within the last ten minutes. I looked off towards the east and could see a dark wall of clouds building. This was a typical July afternoon in central Arizona. The rainy season was in full swing, and this time of day the Monsoon’s always rolled in like clockwork. The storm that was churning off in the distance would bring precious moisture and hopefully a much needed drop in temperature. I glanced down at my four year-old daughter; Madeline. She was still hard at work scanning the freshly dug hole with her pin-pointer.



American Eagle $5 Gold Bullion Coins

By Frank Colletti
From page 36 of the October, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1986, as previously related in Lost Treasure Magazine when we discussed the Silver Bullion $1 Silver Eagle coins, the United States government (i.e. the US mint) decided that, along with the silver bullion, they would also issue a variety of gold bullion coins for investors and collectors.
The gold bullion coins were issued with a denomination of $5 for the one-tenth ounce gold coins, and other sizes, but today we'll discuss the tenth ounce pieces. With the addition of a denomination these pieces are officially coinage of the United States government and, as such, are legal tender.



Ridiculous, Ugly – and Valuable

By Jay Pastor
From page 9 of the October, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Even the two most unpopular commemorative halves are valuable.



Tools of the Trade - Things Aren't Always What They Seem

By Andy Sabisch
From page 32 of the October, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As we have discussed in past columns, the popularity of treasure hunting is on the rise thanks to all of the television shows that have hit the airways in recent years, which is great for the bottom line of metal detector manufacturers, but it presents a challenge to those using the equipment.
That challenge is where to search without being the 100th person to sweep a coil across a given piece of ground. There is no doubt that the metal detectors available today - even the entry level models - offer performance that little more than a decade ago would have been out of reach.



How To: Looking For Places to Hunt

By William Grochowalski
From page 6 of the October, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I am always asked, “Where do you go treasure hunting because you always seem to come back with your pouch full of booty?” That is a very good question, which I am about to explain to you. Hopefully this will help you have a better understanding and a more plentiful outcome to your treasure hunting day.
I always have a plan of action, which is what you should do also. First of all you will need to make a mental list of all the places you would like to go for the day. Place your various destinations in order, closest from your home first so you don’t have to be wasting valuable time driving all day.
I always keep a log of where I have been, what I have found, and when I was there last, along with the date and time spent hunting at each location.



Tesoro Compadre

By Joe Patrick
From page 37 of the September, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When I think of Tesoro metal detectors, four things immediately come to mind - high performance, operating ease, lightweight comfort and high ownership value.Having owned and used many of their models over past years, I can honestly say that each has been fun to use and all have worked very effectively in the field … where it really counts!Tesoro is not a company that typically ‘comes out’ with a new flashy model every year - but only when valid improvements can be made. Recently, that methodology has been used to upgrade and improve their ever-popular turn-on-and-go Compadre model.The original Compadre was introduced in the year 2000, as a replacement for the Amigo II. That Compadre, like the Amigo II, featured a 'hard-wired' 7-inch searchcoil.



How To: Small Towns, USA

By Jay Pastor
From page 47 of the September, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Coinshooting a small town is something like visiting your grandparents. They may be contemporary people, but … well, they’re also living in another dimension: the days gone by. And (common sense prevailing), you often feel that you have their blessing to nose around the basement or attic and keep whatever interests you.
If they trust you, small-towners often leave you with that same feeling. The older folk are typically fond of their community, like to talk about the way it once was, and are quick to tell you about the original swimming pool (replaced in 1927), the “opera” house, the once-popular train station, and the parks and buildings of their youth – sometimes even of their parents’ or grandparents’ youth.



How To: Don't Destroy Valuable Coins and Relics

By John Christopher Fine
From page 44 of the August, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


We had just located coins and artifacts from the wreck of Sir Cloudsley Shovell’s flagship “Association,” off the Isles of Scilly. Excitement and the thrill of discovery as lift bags brought clumps of coins aboard overpowered diver’s restraint. One immediately took a hammer to a clump of coins to break them apart.
It worked; the clump was quickly rendered into pieces and the coins inside exposed. Unfortunately, the rough handling ruined the numismatic value of some of them.
Getting to the point of discovery is often the most arduous and costly part of any expedition. Finding coins or valuable artifacts can offer the thrill of a lifetime. Excavating them or removing them from the site without preparation or in a hurry often destroys their value.